eschergirls:

KPF submitted:

You can just imagine what the green guy is saying: “Aw man, let me try this pose!” (CRACK!!!) “AARGH MY SPINE! OH THE PAIN IS SO HORRIBLE!!!”

What’s with all the arrows?  (There’s on particular arrow on the green guy that’s in a very unfortunate place.)
Maybe her super power is that if she twists her spine she forces everybody around her to start twisting their spine too and that is how she defeats them!

The safety dance. You’re doing it wrong.

eschergirls:

KPF submitted:

You can just imagine what the green guy is saying: “Aw man, let me try this pose!” (CRACK!!!) “AARGH MY SPINE! OH THE PAIN IS SO HORRIBLE!!!”

What’s with all the arrows?  (There’s on particular arrow on the green guy that’s in a very unfortunate place.)

Maybe her super power is that if she twists her spine she forces everybody around her to start twisting their spine too and that is how she defeats them!

The safety dance. You’re doing it wrong.

eschergirls:

That’s Christopher Hart teaching us how to draw men.  Seems like a lot of variety.  He even includes non-muscular thin men and fat men.  Looks good.  I’m glad that we have an artist who gets that there’s a variety of characters you might have to draw and that different body shapes adds to the differentiation of characters!  How refreshi-

Um… So we have one thin athletic large breasted woman… one thin slightly smaller breasted woman, and a whole bunch of thin large breasted women… and apparently pants are banned in the Hart-verse.
My brain boggles at how he could create those 2 pages and not have his head explode from the double standard.
Edit: I forgot to comment on the captions (I was tired when I was writing this up)  Even though men are allowed in the Hart-verse to be fat, apparently they can either be jolly or villains, but not heroes.  And with the women he outright admits that we exist only for sex appeal. -_-

This is bad for everyone, all around. 
I’m a heavyset fellow. I’m working on that, for health and self-esteem reasons. I will say this: I am certainly not jolly. This kind of “how to draw” setup is part of the reason why.
And Eschergirls, not only does Hart not let women have pants, he has apparently also forbidden such things as food. It took me a few look-overs to tell that the female builds weren’t varied up only by their level of starvation.  
Sir-Mix-A-Lot will not be pleased!

eschergirls:

That’s Christopher Hart teaching us how to draw men.  Seems like a lot of variety.  He even includes non-muscular thin men and fat men.  Looks good.  I’m glad that we have an artist who gets that there’s a variety of characters you might have to draw and that different body shapes adds to the differentiation of characters!  How refreshi-

Um… So we have one thin athletic large breasted woman… one thin slightly smaller breasted woman, and a whole bunch of thin large breasted women… and apparently pants are banned in the Hart-verse.

My brain boggles at how he could create those 2 pages and not have his head explode from the double standard.

Edit: I forgot to comment on the captions (I was tired when I was writing this up)  Even though men are allowed in the Hart-verse to be fat, apparently they can either be jolly or villains, but not heroes.  And with the women he outright admits that we exist only for sex appeal. -_-

This is bad for everyone, all around. 

I’m a heavyset fellow. I’m working on that, for health and self-esteem reasons. I will say this: I am certainly not jolly. This kind of “how to draw” setup is part of the reason why.

And Eschergirls, not only does Hart not let women have pants, he has apparently also forbidden such things as food. It took me a few look-overs to tell that the female builds weren’t varied up only by their level of starvation.  

Sir-Mix-A-Lot will not be pleased!

eschergirls:

AHHHHHHHHHHHHH It turns out I NEVER put up the scans I made of Christopher Hart’s “how to draw” books! I thought I did! Time to correct this. >:\

Let’s start with him teaching us how to turn heroes into villains.

I love how the male hero gets more clothed as he turns evil. In fact, he…

I have to wonder if ridiculous shoulder pads are the true sign of evil here. It’s the common thread for both of them. 

Also… seriously… The dude gets sick of it all but the girl gets all traumatized? Really? This how to draw comics guide is actually more sexist than the comics it is supposedly alluding to. Most hero/villain transitions are trauma-driven, regardless of sex. 

I know I’m drifting off of Eschergirls’ source concept here, but this is just offensive in its raw shallowness. The author has no concept of theme. Traditional visual adjustments for heroes and villains falling from grace have been to reach for the trappings of fascism or fetishism. Or both. The numbers on the latter are heavily skewed by Chris Claremont. 

What I see above just seems to be "Hey, remember when DC made Hawk from Hawk and Dove the Monarch despite it making no sense because everyone guessed it was Captain Atom early and they had to switch it up to save the surprise? Lets make a spread about that. Do I have a female counterpart concept for this? Nah, I’ll just fake it."

Seriously, fallen hero-boy there is just the Monarch with the serial numbers filed off. One would think our counterpart example would be Phoenix/Dark Phoenix, buuuut… her costume colors just changed. If you ignore the Claremontism in the whole “Black Queen” stage in the middle there.

Think of how much more fun the four-steps would be if Phoenix had been the inspiration though:

  1. Here we have a founding character of a super-team, finally liberated of a code name that required her to be called ‘girl’ well into her mid-twenties.
  2. After becoming incredibly powerful, she realizes that her boyfriend is the blandest thing since white toast. She meets a mysterious stranger who seduces her and introduces her to his kinky friends.
  3. She realizes her boyfriend-on-the-sly is a manipulative dick, but hey, he unlocked her untapped god-like power. Boyfriend #1 is still dull as toast, though, so some prancing in leather is required.
  4. Getting sick of that, she trades in for her old costume in darker, evil colors. Also, genocide on the planet of the broccoli people. They know what they did.

-Trent

therobotmonster:

I was going to make this my response during a reblog of Dresden Codak’s problematic cleavage post. No one pays attention to the reblog add-ons though, so I’m making this its own post.

Comic companies, here’s the deal:

You can go practical & tasteful on the costumes. The internet can…

The Demographics of Super-Powers

Lets start with this: This post describes what should happen within a universe where people get super-powers, such as the Marvel or DC universe. It does not dictate the motion of the “camera” or upon which characters it should or should not focus.

Think of this as a thought experiment. A lot of comic fans are (bizarrely) focused on realism in their storytelling (the difference between realism and being realistic is a topic I may or may not expand in the future). Now, lets assume that distribution of super-powers is essentially equitable, with different sources that would favor various demographics (super-science experiments gone wrong, living too close to a toxic waste dump, belonging to an obscure religion that uses real magic) balancing each other out.

Lets look at what the average 100 superhumans would be in the United States:

  • 51 will be women, 49 will be men.
  • 7 of these women and 8 of these men will be lesbians/gay or bisexual. Transgender is a little harder to nail down in terms of statistics, but anywhere between 0-3 seems to fit.
  • 65 will be white/non-hispanic, 15 will be hispanic, 13 will be black, 4 will be Asian, 1 will be native american and 2 will be multiethnic. The existence of aliens, undersea human offshoots, creatures from other dimensions, sentient robots, angels, demons and other magical beings will probably throw this off, but the ratios would be the same for whatever chunk of the pie is ‘human’
  • There will be 51 Protestants, 24 Catholics, 2 Mormons, an ‘other’ Christian,  2 Jews, a Buddist, a Muslim, 12 unaffiliated/agnostic/just-don’t-care and 4 atheists. The remaining two characters would be of other faiths not above listed. If the universe in question has active confirmable gods, like the Olympian or Norse pantheons, there would probably be a spike in classical paganism.

I left out age statistics intentionally. Children under a certain age would be less likely to get powers through the typical means and most of the ‘innate’ powers are shown to only manifest as puberty. One would also have to suppose a rather high fatality rate for those involved in adventuring, thus dropping the percentage of 65 and up super-humans. The advent of super-human immortality or agelessness would also skew things.

To repeat, I’m not advocating that writers and artists create checklists to determine if they have enough of a particular race, creed or orientation. What I am putting forward is the idea that the United States population is very diverse and thus so is your potential readership. Just something to think about.

Information from here, here & here.

therobotmonster:

itswalky:

Gender doesn’t matter, you say?  Well!

Then let’s just make Batman, Green Lantern, and Aquaman into females.  Flashpoint’s over, the continuity’s rebooted, and now they always have been women.

Since gender doesn’t matter, obviously nobody will complain.  Noooooobody at all.

Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

I know I’m on the outside here, but I’d be down for that. Totally. I know they’d never actually do a Brynna Wayne or whatnot, but I say, yes, give us a Queen of the Sea character, yes, give us a female Green Lantern.

I would far rather read stories about Mera, Queen of Atlantis/AquaWoman than any version of Aquaman except Brave & the Bold Aquaman.*

DC has a ton of characters that are just plain BORING. Hand those mantles to a more diverse character cast, throw it all against the wall and see what sticks. I am aghast that we actually do have comic nerds getting up in arms at the suggestion of having teams that are roughly evenly split between male and female characters.

Someone seriously would turn down a Teen Titans title that was Robin, Starfire, Raven, Cyborg, Wonder Girl and Blue Beetle (Reyes, not Kord)? That would be too many girls for their taste? The JLA would implode if it was Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Zatanna, Flash, Green Lantern and Black Canary?

The world would end if Jesse Quick got to call herself “the Flash” and get her own book?

Oy vey.

-The Robot Monster

*Put them both in the same book. BAM! Superhero sitcom!


therobotmonster:

websnark:

We are on the far side of the San Diego ComiCon. This is a con where DC’s creators have had their most direct exposure to their current fanbase’s reactions to the New 52. In particular, they’ve heard loud and clear that the ongoing lack of gender parity both in the comics and behind the scenes…

DC’s reboot doesn’t seem to appeal to anyone, really. The sexism is a big chunk of the iceberg, but the sexism itself is directly tied to the reboots regressive nature. It is a step back in almost every conceivable fashion. Yes, they love them some Barry Allen for reasons I can’t fathom beyond pure nostalgia. Then why not give us some flashback tales to his adventures in, say, the 1960s, and let someone new take up the mantle? Someone… interesting?

I’m not so sure they’re being sexist for sexism’s sake. They’re being sexist for the sale of boring tradition. That makes it even more baffling and senseless.

Comics should be for everyone. There are TV shows for every imaginable audience, so why does DC feel that every book has to be aimed at the same demographic? Even within that assumed demographic, who has ever said “I don’t want to read this book, there’s too many girls in it?”